Tania Khalil on life in the United States: “We ended up honoring our country” – from

Tania Khalil (Photo: Playback / Instagram @marcioamaralp @skep360patycantoni)

Tania Khalil moved with her family to the United States nearly five years ago. Married to musician Jair Oliveira, 47, and mother Isabella14 years and Lura11, The 44-year-old actress and psychologist first lived in New York, where she has been through some tough times during the Covid-19 pandemic.

“The restriction in New York was too much, we couldn’t go outside. But we stayed there for a long time, I studied with the best film directors, I did jobs, many auditions, my daughters had amazing experiences, I saw all the musicals I could, we came to Weston [na Flórida] With a proposal to unite us further as a family, to rediscover new perspectives and new possibilities,” he says.

Tanya remembers that she and Gayer have always wanted to live in New York. “Gayer lived there for a long time. Before we moved, we used to go there a lot, we’d stay for a couple of months between jobs and come back. The girls were young and went too. There are a lot of summer activities for kids there. It’s a very strong technical point, as there are a lot of Ways to nourish oneself with music, and theater has always been the place we wanted to experience for a longer period of time in our lives,” he explains.

Jair Oliveira and Tania Khalil (Image: clone/Instagram)

Jair Oliveira and Tania Khalil (Image: clone/Instagram)

Read the full interview with Tanya below:

Was living outside Brazil always a plan?
Since the day I met Gayer, he’s wanted us to move in. But I didn’t want to quit my job. But when I turned 40, there was a huge change in my life. I wanted to live other things, I felt I had something more to live inside of me, and had this opportunity to change countries and see myself in other perspectives, reinvent myself, live in another language, another culture, and be able to see the world with new lenses.

You’ve also been able to rediscover yourself as an actress and even acted Mrs. Fletcherwith Catherine Hahn, and join the local Actors Guild, right?
As an artist it was very enriching because I forced myself. I auditioned with great directors, something we don’t have in Brazil. They usually take me as a foreigner in exams. I had a very rich experience and had the opportunity to work on HBO with an amazing Hollywood actress. This was just before the pandemic and it really gave me a great feeling.

How is the Brazilian artist seen abroad?
It’s respectful, although the American is not extroverted. The whole time you have to keep punching the knife. We have quality, we are sensitive, we know how to become emotional, because we are ready. Obviously TV Globo gave me this opportunity to prepare myself for any setting. This HBO act was a great production, with the cameras, people, crew… It was a huge production. But Globo prepared me to face this. It was amazing!

How do you deal with missing family members who are in Brazil?
The longing is huge. When I go to Brazil, I never want to go back. My passion for the country is still great, I never thought I would live the experience of coming abroad with Gayer and ended up with a charm. But I love Brazil above all. I never left to escape or because Brazil is in chaos. This was never the goal, the idea was to expand myself as a person and as a family.

Did you look at Brazil differently after moving?
very! I love how every day we see how wonderful Brazil is. There are countless difficulties, but we end up honoring our country. There are 300,000 other bureaucracies here. There is always an illusion that America is better. And in this regard, there are much greater opportunities for art and for children to be freer and safer and to meet people from all over the world. Access to education must be extended to all.

Jair Oliveira and Tania Khalil with their youngest Laura (Image: Reproduction/Instagram)

Jair Oliveira and Tania Khalil with their youngest Laura (Image: Reproduction/Instagram)

Have the girls adapted well to the change?
When we moved in, Laura was 6 and Issa was 9-10. Issa spoke a little English, and she spoke very well, but we didn’t know she would do so well. But Laura, who doesn’t speak at all, is the only one who speaks exactly like Americans, without an accent. Issa writes brilliantly, but Laura’s speech is impeccable. It is important to speak two languages ​​fluently.

Are you thinking of living in the US forever?
I don’t know. My daughters say that when I go back to Brazil, I want to stay. If I go to China I want to stay too (He laughs). It’s good that I’m that person who goes with the flow of water, like a good Cancer. Making plans is not for me. There are many things I lose because of this, but I also gain a lot from being flexible with what nature brings me, with opportunities, and desires. I joke with my mother: “Mom, don’t trust me, because I’m going to turn the corner and change my mind.” “I’ve known you since you were born,” she says. I don’t know how to answer. I would love to be here now. But a vacation in Brazil is another drama.

Do you go more to Brazil or do your family go more to the United States?
The people who go there the most. My wonderful mother-in-law comes here often. Without it, it would have been very difficult. It’s part of the family that supports us and stays here. My mom and dad still work more hours regularly and don’t travel much. They ask us to go to Brazil. The proximity of my mother-in-law is a gift from the gods, and sometimes we want to lock her up here (He laughs). Then the girls want their grandmother all the time.

You said you’ve changed a lot at the age of 40. By what logic?
For me, turning 40 is a symbol, especially for women, because it’s a decade in which there’s a giant hormonal shift and we’re no longer able to generate people and we have to start generating other things that make sense within us, like basically, where we can feed ourselves as beings in a new way. . That was pretty obvious to me until I came to the States. I saw myself often during a period when I had been practicing meditation for a long time and meditation gave way to new.

What is your turning point?
I looked at Isabella when she was ten years old and thought: “Oh, my God, she just worked, eight years from now she’s going to college, she’s going into the world, and more than half of her young life you might not have been with me. Then I had this thought: “Is this how I want to spend the rest of my time?” 40 years is a lifestyle milestone, and more than a perfect milestone, it affects our bodies.

That’s when you created the Stage of Life workshop for women over 40, right?
Yeah. After much study, I have developed artistic tools that we can use for self-development, to show how theater and art can help us. After all, art has always brought foreplay and the potential for catharsis. I was preparing myself with different types of therapy. Theater is the tool that makes it possible to see from the outside, to construct the reality we want to see inside, the scenario of life in which we can live. Combined personal development technique and psychodrama. It is a technique for lay people, not artists, and it provides a tool for self-knowledge in a very light, fun and profound way.

Tania Khalil with her firstborn, Isabella (Image: Engage/Instagram)

Tania Khalil with her firstborn, Isabella (Image: Engage/Instagram)

Tania Khalil with her youngest Laura (Image: clone/Instagram)

Tania Khalil with her youngest Laura (Image: clone/Instagram)

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